Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family?
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Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family?

The flu vaccine is a good idea for all families. It does not cause the flu and it helps keep kids and parents from getting sick. Getting the flu is worse than having a cold and can make a person sick for a week or more.

Babies younger than 6 months old can't get the vaccine, but if their parents, other caregivers, and older kids in the household get it, that will help protect the baby. This is important because infants are more at risk for serious complications from the flu.

Who Should Get the Flu Vaccine?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older.

But it's especially important for those who are at greater risk of developing health problems from the flu, including:

  • all kids 6 months through 4 years old (babies younger than 6 months are also considered high risk, but they cannot receive the flu vaccine)
  • anyone 65 years and older
  • all women who are pregnant, are considering pregnancy, have recently given birth, or are breastfeeding during flu season
  • anyone whose immune system is weakened from medications or illnesses (like HIV infection)
  • residents of long-term care facilities, such as nursing homes
  • anyone (adults, teens, and kids) with a chronic medical condition, such as asthma
  • kids or teens who take aspirin regularly and are at risk for developing Reye syndrome if they get the flu
  • caregivers or household contacts of anyone in a high-risk group (like children younger than 5 years old, especially those younger than 6 months, and those with high-risk conditions)

Certain things might prevent a person from getting the flu vaccine. Talk to your doctor to see if the vaccine is still recommended if your child:

What Are the Types of Flu Vaccine?

Different types of flu vaccines are available. One type (called trivalent) protects against three strains of the flu virus (usually, two types of influenza A viruses and one influenza B virus). Another type (called quadrivalent) protects against four strains (usually, two types of influenza A viruses and two types of influenza B viruses).

The vaccine is given to kids by injection with a needle (the flu shot) or by nasal spray (FluMist®). The flu shot is preferred for children of all ages because it has been shown to be safe and effective. The nasal spray vaccine was not recommended for the last two flu seasons because it didn't work as well as the shot. A new version of it is now recommended for the 2018–2019 flu season for kids who otherwise might not get a flu shot (for example, if a child is afraid of needles or if the flu shot isn't available at the doctor's office). The nasal spray is only for healthy people ages 2 through 49. People with weakened immune systems or some health conditions (such as asthma) and pregnant women should not get the nasal spray vaccine.

Vaccine shortages and delays sometimes happen, so check with your doctor about availability and to see which vaccine is right for your kids.

Egg Allergy and Flu Vaccine

In the past, it was recommended that anyone with an egg allergy talk to a doctor about whether receiving the flu vaccine was safe because it is grown inside eggs. But health experts now say that the amount of egg allergen in the vaccine is so tiny that it is safe even for kids with a severe egg allergy. This is especially important during a severe flu season.

Still, a child with an egg allergy should get the flu shot in a doctor's office, not at a supermarket, drugstore, or other venue.

If your child is sick and has a fever, or is wheezing, talk to your doctor about rescheduling the flu shot.

When Should Kids Get the Flu Vaccine?

Flu season runs from October to May. It's best to get a flu shot as early in the season as possible, as it gives the body a chance to build up immunity to (protection from) the flu. But getting a shot later in the season is still better than not getting the vaccine at all.

Date reviewed: October 2018